Carrie

I'm wondering if this movie was remade now because anti-bullying campaigns are so much in the news right now. I mean, if there was any kind of a chance that telekinetic powers actually existed, even just 10%, at least a few bullies might think twice about harassing their classmates out of sheer self-preservation. Well, maybe one or two might. But if you ever had anything bad happen to you in high school, and I mean anything, approach this movie with caution.

Carrie White (Chloë Grace Moretz, Dark Shadows) is your classic social outcast. Her mother (Julianne Moore, Children of Men) is... let's start with overprotective. She used to homeschool Carrie, but now the poor girl is in a regular high school, wearing clothes her mother makes for her and having been raised to think that virtually everything is a sin and everyone else is just waiting for you to slip up somehow so they can kick you while you're down. And, well, depending on the school, that last part might actually be true. It's certainly true at this school, or at least true of head Mean Girl Chris (Portia Doubleday), who's hated Carrie since the sixth grade. With their senior year of high school now winding down, Chris realizes she's running out of time to make Carrie's life miserable, and decides to step things up.

But when a locker-room incident (didn't you just know it would happen in a locker room?) gets horribly out of hand and video of it hits the internet, the other, less mean girls think Chris has gone too far. Feeling especially guilty is Sue (Gabriella Wilde, The Three Musketeers), who wants to do something tremendously nice for Carrie to make up for everything. And with prom coming up, Sue hits on the perfect plan: arrange for her boyfriend, Tommy (Ansel Elgort) to take Carrie as his date.

The only teacher who seems to realize that there's a problem (gym teacher Ms. Desjardin, played by Judy Greer) thinks that this is all part of another prank, and it's hard to blame her. Even the English teacher isn't all that nice to Carrie, when she reads from her favorite poem, John Milton's Samson Agonistes. Which, granted, isn't exactly a mainstream choice, but he's the teacher, for heaven's sake.

Anyway, joining Chris in her cartoon villainy is her boyfriend, Billy (Alex Russell, Chronicle), and if there have ever been any antagonists in the history of cinema that were more one-dimensional, I don't want to contemplate it. The whole film lacks a certain edge, despite all the many sharp, pointy objects it features, from Carrie's mother's sewing shears to shards of broken mirror in the girls's bathroom. Basically, I felt like I'd seen this movie before, except I never did see the original version, so that wasn't it.

Two and three-quarters is about the best I can do. Nothing wrong with the acting, but nothing else ever really seems to click. About the best I can say for it is that it might be a useful therapy tool for those dealing with PTSD after bad school experiences. At least the odds are good that nothing quite so awful ever happened to you.

Image: 
Don't make her angry. You wouldn't like her when she's angry.

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thanks for share!

thanks for share!

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