Knight & Day

Poor Tom Cruise. He had to settle for third place in the box office, behind Toy Story 3 and some Adam Sandler thing. I'd say poor Cameron Diaz, too, but in her case this is a serious step up from The Box, so she's not doing so badly.

Tom is Roy Miller. Not to be confused with Matt Damon as Roy Miller from The Green Zone, because confusing those two would be a crime. The Tom Cruise Roy Miller is more like Jason Bourne, anyway, though you still shouldn't confuse the two. Jason Bourne could beat Tom Cruise Roy Miller to a pulp. But anyway. He's some sort of top secret Black Ops agent, currently on the run from his bosses and a lot of other people besides. Bad Things happened on his last assignment, and the government is blaming him. He, in turn, is blaming another agent, named Fitzgerald (Peter Sarsgaard), for the whole mess, but no one believes him for a second.

Cameron is June Havens, a "nobody" like you and me, going about her daily life. (Spies, in this movie, call non-spies nobodies. I think that's their way of making themselves feel better about having chosen a career that gives them the life expectancy of a fruit fly.) She runs a garage that specializes in restoring old cars. Her sister, April (cruel parents), is getting married and making June wear a yellow dress with some sort of petticoat thing, because that's the sort of weird thing brides do. April is played by Maggie Grace from Taken, though it doesn't matter because you see her for about four minutes and she hardly says a word.

These two run into each other at the airport. Twice. Possibly he was magnetically attracted to all the old car parts she had in her bag. I was surprised they let her fly with those, actually. Anyway, within an hour of that meeting, he's already developed two habits that he will keep for the rest of the movie: first, he only tells her a tiny fraction of the truth at a time, which as it turns out is even more useful than flat-out lying; and second, he drugs her. In fact, one of these two characters is under the influence of some sort of drug for a good third of the film, which probably hasn't happened since Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas was made into a movie. These are made-up spy drugs, though, like knockout drops and truth serums.

Roy was charged with protecting a wondrous new invention and the guy -- well, kid, really -- who invented it (Paul Dano). That didn't work out so well, of course, but Roy's determined to put things right again. He's somewhat hampered by all the people trying to kill him for this gadget (code-named Zephyr), but probably June herself is more of a problem. To be fair, she just gets thrown into all the shooting and mayhem without an instruction manual; though on the other hand the bad guys all seem to be such terrible shots, it almost doesn't matter. They both walk through hails of bullets without getting scratched.

So June's pretty freaked out, when she isn't drugged. Roy is considerate, though, in a way. Is complimenting a woman on her driving while she's being shot at and generally traumatized because of something you did considerate? Maybe it's a washout at that point, I don't know. He is very tolerant and understanding of her frequent nervous breakdowns, though.

They filmed all sorts of lovely places, like Austria and Jamaica. They destroy several expensive sports cars during a chase. When told to wait in the hotel room, stay in the car, or stay out of the car, no one ever does any of those things, no matter how sensible it would be to obey. There's even a dramatic rooftop chase, so you know you're watching a real spy movie, though a real spy movie played for laughs. It's sort of like Chuck on the big screen, only not as good as far as I'm concerned, since Chuck is one of my major slightly guilty pleasures. Even so, the movie gets a solid three out of five. I won't care to own the DVD, but it might hit my Netflix queue at some point. And the moral lesson here is that the more you hear words like contained, safe, and secure being tossed around, the more ready you should be to run.

Image: 
Tom and Cameron as Roy and June, on the run.

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In fact, one of these two

In fact, one of these two characters is under the influence of some sort of drug for a good third of the film, which probably hasn't happened since Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas was made into a movie. These are made-up spy drugs, though, like knockout drops and truth serums.

This industry is fluctuating

This industry is fluctuating and bumpy for each and every name. It depends so much on the audience and their perception. History of movies has many witnesses about such ups and downs. I appreciate the interesting discussion.

I am really impressed by the

I am really impressed by the encouraging post about the movie review especially about these expensive cars in the big screen. It is always pleasing to watch car races/chasing in the movies.

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