Timothy J. Cox

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Mail Time

There are plenty of jokes about mail carriers out there and how cushy their job is, but it isn't necessarily all that great. There's the walking and the weather, not to mention dogs and rude people. And in some cases there's also the other side of the coin. At my day job I often see the mail carrier arrive, and my co-worker loves to corner him with badly-told stories about her dog and long conversations about the weather. Like the poor guy doesn't already have everyone asking if it's cold (or hot) enough for him.

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Ted doing a magic trick. Note that there's absolutely nothing up his sleeves.

The Watchers

We've all had that feeling now and then, that indefinable certainty that someone's looking at us. Sometimes we're right about it, sometimes wrong, but in either case the feeling doesn't last and we go about our day. In The Watchers, though, John (Jeff Moffitt) is having more of a problem with that feeling than usual. Everywhere he turns, he insists there's someone watching him and it's bothering him so much he's making emergency calls to his psychiatrist Dr. Orwell (Timothy J. Cox).

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John finally gets a call, but not the one he's been hoping for.

Solutions

Every generation thinks they're living at the worst possible time for dirty politics and shocking scandals, but of course politics has always been a dirty business and these days it just seems worse because it spreads all over the internet in five seconds and then you can't get away from it. Still, I have to admit that this last year or so probably has been particularly unpleasant and not just because it seems to be everywhere all the time. In Solutions, though, politics are even dirtier than usual.

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It's so touching to see a kid out on his first stakeout with his dad.

To Be Alone

There's something particularly numbing about being alone when you aren't used to it. William (Timothy J. Cox) certainly isn't used to it, as he moves aimlessly about his large, empty house in the woods. He wears a wedding ring but there's no sign of his wife anywhere. He fills his time with sleep, religious television shows, his Bible, and pointless building projects. Or perhaps what he's building isn't so pointless after all.

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William in the lonely, lonely woods.

Psychic Murder

Of all the difficult gigs there are in the entertainment world, one of the toughest has to be stand-up comedy. I once heard a comic making fun of his own profession (as many of them do), talking about how people usually don't even know who's performing at the local comedy club; they just go there because they want to go out. You hardly ever see people doing that with movies at the theatre. Granted, I did that once but those were special circumstances, and it really isn't the norm.

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Mickey ready to pounce, while Puma looks faintly amused.

Trouble

In the hallowed halls of St. Sebastian's Quiet Academy for Disreputable Youth, things are indeed quiet, probably because no one's allowed to do anything. The boys drift mournfully around, attend 'classes' where they act out doubtful morality plays, and are forced to wear identical outfits of tan pants and light blue shirts. One character plays music on a boom box and I was shocked they allowed such goings-on. If the kids only wore darker clothes it would be like there was constantly a funeral in progress.

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The headmaster lectures Issac. Sorry kid, but you just don't have any character.

Over Coffee

If you work in an office, half the fun is keeping track of the gossip that goes around -- or if you're more like me, the gossip is actually the single biggest problem about working in an office. Who's got the time to keep track of all that anyway? But in the workplace featured in Over Coffee, everyone knows one thing for sure: that Andrew (Erik Potempa) has a crush on Carla (Jocelyn DeBoer). David (Michael Oberholtzer) likes to tease Andrew about it, but then David's kind of a jerk.

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Carla and boss-man Rice. Note the look of vague terror in her eyes.

Dirty Books

I hadn't really thought about it before, but there probably aren't an awful lot of paper and ink school newspapers anymore. Mind you, I went to school in a town so small that the school's paper was also the town's paper, but it does seem a shame to lose the actual newsprint. Online writing is great (I'd better say that, right?), but there is also something irreplaceable about holding a book or a newspaper in your hands.

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Woodward meets with Deep Throat. I mean, David meets with Owens.

What Jack Built

In a little shack somewhere deep in the woods, Jack (Timothy J. Cox, Night Job) is building something mysterious. He's working quickly and secretly, following a set of complicated hand-drawn and illustrated plans. They seem like the sort of plans that Rube Goldberg might have designed, with added hints of Wile E. Coyote and just a touch of Da Vinci thrown in for good measure. However odd they might look, though, Jack is taking them very seriously.

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You can't imagine how glad Jack is to see this keyboard.

Night Job

Things are starting to look up for James (Jason Torres). He's had to take a break from college, but he's just finished training for his new job, working as a doorman for a New York apartment building. As the title says, though, this is a night job, and he isn't used to working the graveyard shift, plus he was called in at the last minute to cover for someone who was sick, so when he starts his shift he's already been awake all day. And when the very first person you have to deal with is a priest (Robert Youngren) saying he's there for the exorcism, you know you're in for quite a night.

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Local bodega employees initiate James into the bizarro world of the night shift.