All Over Again

It happens to us all. Everyone has things they want and need to do, except somehow, before we know it, it’s three months or three years later and these things still haven’t gotten done. Whether it’s spouses, parents, kids, or just our day jobs, there always seems to be something clamoring for our attention. Things like writing, traveling, or finally turning that spare room into an art studio end up getting put off just one more day in favor of things like putting in overtime to finish the annual reports or helping the kids with homework.

Gregory with his guitar
If you’ve ever wondered where all the inspiration has gone, you’ve probably had this look too.

For Gregory (Joseph Fuoco) in the short All Over Again, it’s his music that’s been neglected, his beloved guitar gradually set aside once Victoria (Constance Reshey) gives him the news that they’re expecting. Gregory’s family means the world to him, but as Adam (Mahdi Shaji) grows up, there’s increasingly a sense of something lost that might not be found again. Gregory spends more and more time at The Bus Stop Music Cafe for open mic night, listening to hopefuls performing poetry readings or play their instruments,, even taking young people like Luis (David Andro) under his wing and enjoying the creative energy even if he doesn’t quite feel a part of it. The big question is, will he ever feel part of it again, or is that aspect of his life gone forever?

Despite encouragement from family and friends, it’s a difficult thing to try to get back on that particular horse, and no wonder. Skills get rusty and no one wants to be the person left sitting awkwardly on stage while the audience offers vague applause, or worse, total silence. Booing is pretty bad, but at least there the audience is actually expending some energy. But it can be a big leap to perform on stage, even a small one, and Gregory’s hesitation is palpable.

It isn’t really fame and fortune Gregory is after — though either or both might be nice for a while — so much as the chance to express himself, and while that phrase has been terribly overused in pop psychology, for many creative people it’s a vital and necessary part of existence, without which there will always be a real feeling of loss. This movie demonstrates that simply and capably, moving back and forth from the present day to the family’s beginnings, showing both how one chapter ended and which might, just possibly, start all over again now. Fuoco is completely convincing as Gregory, his expression often speaking volumes as he takes his first steps back to his music. It’s a quiet little gem of a film that reminds all of us it’s never too late.